Chart of the Day: Distribution of Parking Revenue

This is a chart from Donald Shoup’s parking tome, The High Cost of Free Parking. Here’s Shoup’s explanation [from Chapter 12]: Consider the lower left corner, which represents the current situation in almost every city: all curb parking revenue goes into the general fund and nothing goes to the neighborhoods. … Because everyone objects to paying for parking, […]

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Sunday Summary, July 20, 2014

Everything posted on streets.mn this week linked in one convenient post: Highly visual posts on crossing the street:  Ignore the Red Hand of overregulation, You Don’t Have to Live Like a Refugee (or, how to get off the island), and Speeding Up the Green Line suggesting fixes for “unnecessarily restrictive traffic signals” to keep the train moving […]

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Sunday Sketch – The Ruins of Saint Paul

‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.” From Ozymandias by Percy Blythe Shelley (listen to Bryan Cranston’s recital of the poem on You Tube) I  love drawing ruins. Ruins […]

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The Bike Brothers (video)

Via kottke.org >. In 1986, the BBC produced a short documentary film on the Taylor brothers, a trio of professional cyclists from the 1930s and 40s. The three of them operated a bicycle shop, which turned out handmade bikes for decades. Delightful. Don’t miss one of the brothers putting the racing stripes on a frame […]

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Bikes and Skyways

I think this Skyway Bike Race is from Red Bull Ride the Sky 2007. (via Mulad ) Another perspective here: Streets.mn is a non-profit and is volunteer run. We rely on your support to keep the servers running. If you value what you read, please consider becoming a member.

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Ignore the Red Hand

It’s been pointed out many times that the Washington Ave. transit mall is over-regulated and most people ignore the signals. My schedule happens to take me down and across the transit mall a couple times a week on foot, and while it’s true that most people ignore them, I still too often see timid pedestrians […]

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Transit Budgets Expose Hidden Costs of Roads

Transit projects make for easy political targets because of high construction costs. They have prices in the many millions of dollars, and occasionally tip into the billions, which brings critics out of the woodwork. It’s difficult to know whether certain projects are justifiable or not, particularly because different modes of transportation concentrate and spread out […]

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It’s Not a Bottleneck, It’s a Turkey Neck

Around these parts, it’s not an unpopular belief that the Hennepin-Lyndale Bottleneck is a bit – ah, how to put it? – oversized. The City of Minneapolis’ Public Works Department does not appear to share this belief, as they’ve submitted a design for the Bottleneck that retains its massivity. When a loved one has a […]

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You Don’t Have to Live Like a Refugee

Listen, it don’t really matter to me baby You believe what you want to believe You see you don’t have to live like a refugee (Don’t have to live like a refugee) Yeah Somewhere, somehow, somebody Must have kicked you around some Tell me, why you wanna lay there Revel in your abandon It don’t […]

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Chart of the Day: Protected Bike Lanes vs. Ridership

Speaking of induced demand, this chart measures the growth in bike ridership before and after the construction of protected bike lanes in a number of cities around the US, including Austin, Portland, and Chicago.   [It comes from this report:  Lessons from the Green Lanes.] Streets.mn is a non-profit and is volunteer run. We rely […]

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I Am Induced Demand (and So Can You)!

“Induced demand” is the “build-it-and-they-will-come” theory of driving. If you add a lane, that lane will fill with traffic. Essentially, if you make it easier or faster to drive, people will do just that, and do it in droves. So the latest discussion of the future of 26th and 28th Streets has prompted me to realize […]

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This Morning, I Wore a Sweater

July 14, 0700 hours, 61 degrees.   I put a sweater on.  I sat downtown to wait for my bus, closed my eyes, and took it all in. Buses rumble bumble down Marquette in between buildings with names of corporation-people past and present, whooshing warm wind after they’ve passed. Air brakes pump, kneeling bus ramps […]

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Northfield: Adding Value to Woodley Street

Streets belong to you…and me…and everybody else; streets are public spaces – like parks – and might just be our most undervalued and underutilized community resources.  Northfield and Rice County are beginning to plan a reconstruction project on Woodley Street and this particular street is a golden opportunity to add value and change the conversation, too. What […]

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A Kid, Some Bottles, and an Engineer On a Bike

By U.S. standards we have fairly good pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure around the Twin Cities. For many years Minneapolis was ranked number two in the nation and quite proud of it. In 2011 we even jumped up to number one briefly. How times change. We were back to our comfortable number two in 2012, the […]

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Chart of the Day: Approaching Peak Portland?

When will we exhaust our supplies of Portland? Research suggests that Peak Portland may be just around the corner–the rate of discovery of new sources of Portland has slowly decreased to a mere trickle over the past several decades. In 2013, Portland consumption hit an all-time high, reaching 31 Portland mentions per person per month […]

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Neighbors Put Pedestrians First on West 29th Street

For the folks who missed the West 29th Street Reconstruction Open House in May, you missed the ultimate rarity: a public meeting in which everyone seems to agree on something! 29th might in fact be the most pot-holed and least attractive street in the city, but this didn’t seem to sway folks’ decidedly pro-pedestrian enthusiasm. […]

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Speeding Up the Green Line

The Green Line’s on-time performance is poor. Few trains are able to meet the already relaxed running time. Lateness of 5 minutes is typical and 12 minutes not uncommon. After almost a month of late and erratically timed trains, it’s clear that unnecessarily restrictive traffic signals in St. Paul are the culprit. In contrast, Minneapolis […]

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