Author Archive | Bill Lindeke

Five Easy Pieces of Low-Hanging Bicycle Fruit that Saint Paul Should Pick

The “low-hanging fruit” is a classic planning metaphor, the kind of thing that you hear all the time at meetings or during in-depth discussions about systemic behavior change. The concept is pretty simple: instead of beginning with the most challenging, expensive, or politically difficult projects, start with the easy, simple, or efficacious ones. In her book, Joyride, […]

Continue Reading 32

Map Monday: US Regional Map where Minneapolis is Connected to Dallas

There are a couple maps like this floating around where the US is divided up into geographic regions based on culture, economics, or other kinds of geography. This is one of the more interesting, from the New York Times-slash-Joel Kotkin. Here’s the map:   The author of the opinion article, Parag Khanna, makes a compelling argument that […]

Continue Reading 1

Chart of the Day: Bicycling Health Benefits at Different Pollution Levels

This chart from the Financial Times is impossible to pass up, showing the health benefits of urban bicycling at different levels of particulate pollution. The article includes a helpful cycling benefits chart generator, where you plug in the current Twin Cities’ PM2.5 air quality measurement and it gives you a cool chart showing the relationship between exercise […]

Continue Reading 5

Map Monday: Twin Cities Walkable Grocery Store Density

(Yes, I know it’s Tuesday… but you know, three day weekends and all that.) Here’s a map from a recent article by David Levinson, former streets.mn board chair and Engineering professor at the University of Minnesota. The article examines the interesting intersection of walkability and continuity, how walkable urban nodes seem disconnected from each other in many cities. […]

Continue Reading 6

Chart of the Day: Small Business Turnover vs. Gentrification in New York City

From City Observatory, here’s an interesting chart ripped from a study about small business turnover and gentrification in New York City. It compares the number of businesses that close, go vacant, or are replaced with new businesses in gentrifying and non-gentrifying neighborhoods (gentrifying neighborhoods were defined as meeting a certain change in income within a census tract). Here’s […]

Continue Reading