Author Archive | Bill Lindeke

Chart of the Day: Walkable Urbanism vs Social Equity

Here’s a chart from a recent Citylab article called “In the U.S., Walkability is a Premium Good“, using a new analysis of the amount of “walkable urbanism”  in different US cities. (Or, as I think of it, the “sidewalk factor.”) The article goes over a number of different variables correlated with walkability, including GDP, but the chart […]

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Map Monday: Saint Paul Streets Ranked for Road Diet Potential

I’ve been following the progress of erstwhile streets.mn commenter and cartographic wunderkind Al Davison via Twitter as he has been putting together a map project showing the road diet potential of Saint Paul’s 4-lane streets. This kind of map is a big deal given the increased conversation around pedestrian safety in Saint Paul. (See also today’s […]

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Chart of the Day: Shopkeepers Travel Mode Share Estimates (Bristol UK)

Alex Schieferdecker turned me onto an old Citylab article about parking perception versus parking reality called Four Reasons Retailers Don’t Need Free Parking. It cites a (hard to find) study out of the UK which charted perceived mode-share versus actual mode share for a shopping street in Bristol, UK (a medium-sized city in the Southwest, population 450K). Here’s the chart […]

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Map of the Day: Workforce Population Change, 2010 – 2040

Here’s an interesting map from a blogpost by the terrific Chicago-based writer, Aaron Renn. The map comes from a Pew Charitable Trust report that offers some population projections. This one shows the “workforce” data, the number of people in the peak working demographic of 25-54. Here you go: It’s interesting to me because Minneapolis / […]

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Chart of the Day: Expensive vs Expansive US Cities

Here’s a neat chart from a Canadian urbanism blog called Spacing Toronto, about the relationship between density and affordability for housing in different US cities. Here’s the chart: In the detailed blog post, Dylan Reid explains how there’s a “paradox” in the results, where the cities with the highest density are also the cities that are […]

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Map Monday: Peak Population Percentage of US States

Here’s a fun map, made by New York-based information visualization expert (and cartoonist) Dorothy Gambrell, showing “peak state.” In other words, according to the US census, it shows the decade at which each state contained the peak percentage of the US population. It’s a fun map. Some of the things that catch my eye are the general Westward […]

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