Author: Jeff Wood

Jeff Wood

About Jeff Wood

Jeff Wood is an urban planner focused on transportation and land use issues living and working in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jeff blogs at The Overhead Wire and tweets @theoverheadwire. He also shares news links daily from around the country on issues related to cities at The Direct Transfer

Street view of an alleyway in Tokyo, Japan.

National Links: Energized Cities

Michael E Smith, professor of anthropology at Arizona State University, describes how early cities thrived through energized crowding; Oslo plans for major emissions reduction; and how Seattle has radically changed within this past decade.

Central Park in New York City in the fall. A wide path lined with lights and benches, covered by a large tree canopy.

National Links: Olmstead’s 200th Birthday

Last Tuesday would have been famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted’s 200th birthday. His thinking on design would change the way we think about urban parks and the restorative nature of green space in urban places. While most know of his most famous work of Central Park in New York City, he designed as part of his practice hundreds of other parks around the country. A new guide features some of these lesser-known spaces.

Queensboro Bridge connecting Manhattan and Queens in New York.

National Links: 300 Languages, One Street

Along Roosevelt Avenue in Queens, more than 300 languages are spoken. As the 7 train runs over the “artery of life”, commerce explodes underneath with vibrancy and community. The street is a microcosm of the world and what goes on there sometimes impacts what happens on the other side of the globe.

National Links: Designing Pedestrian Dignity

Why green space doesn’t make suburbs more environmentally friendly than cities, how Japanese toddlers are more helpful to their parents and more on global urban trends.

National Links: Selling Omaha

How Boomers get the housing crisis wrong, why a poor sense of direction could be an early sign of dementia and more “old news.”

National Links: Transit and Housing

National Links examines why transit matters: in where we work, in the urgency to coordinate transit and housing, in the need for federal funding.