Chart of the Day – Percentage of Miles of Twin City Urban Freeway System Congestion

Percentage of Miles of Twin City Urban Freeway System Congestion. Source: Metropolitan Freeway System 2012 Congestion Report

Percentage of Miles of Twin City Urban Freeway System Congestion. Source: Metropolitan Freeway System 2012 Congestion Report

This graph shows the percentage of congested directional miles on the MnDOT managed freeway system for the Twin Cities metro area, from the Metropolitan Freeway System 2012 Congestion Report. The trend lines show the difficulties with extrapolation, as choosing different bases will produce widely different trends. The 10 year trend is essentially flat, projecting a 2030 value the same as today, while the five year trend (which starts at the nadir of the recession) projects huge increases.

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8 Responses to Chart of the Day – Percentage of Miles of Twin City Urban Freeway System Congestion

  1. Bill Lindeke
    Bill Lindeke March 5, 2014 at 7:17 am #

    this chart is pretty interesting.

    1) ramp meters had a bigger impact on our freeways than 35W
    2) which trend is the most important: long term, 10 yr, 5 yr, or 3 yr?
    3) how does this number affect average commute time in the TC (if at all)?

  2. Alex March 5, 2014 at 10:05 am #

    Again I think it’s interesting to compare this to recent infographics about the transit system, in this case Metro Transit’s 2013 “fact” book. Metro Transit considers their on-time performance to be fairly insignificant, occupying less space, for example, than their lost-and-found. MnDot, in the meantime, produces entire reports on how congested their system is, presumably in the hopes of drumming up funds to mitigate that congestion. I’m not sure the differing approaches entirely explains why MnDot gets 50x as much state funding as Metro Transit, but it may be a part of the explanation.

    • Bill Lindeke
      Bill March 5, 2014 at 5:29 pm #

      It’s bc roads have a dedicated funding source, while transit has to sing for its supper.

      • Alex March 6, 2014 at 9:21 am #

        Is that the cause or the effect?

        • Bill Lindeke
          Bill Lindeke March 6, 2014 at 9:33 am #

          i do not embrace linear time

  3. Jonathan March 6, 2014 at 8:13 am #

    Bill- Of course ramp meters had a bigger impact- it had effect system-wide on every congested freeway segment, and not just in one location and corridor. And no temporary lanes were built on parallel freeways to compensate for the ramp meter shutdown.

    • Bill Lindeke
      Bill Lindeke March 6, 2014 at 9:08 am #

      It just makes me think that so much more could be done about the demand side of freeway congestion, instead of fixating on the supply…

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  1. Sunday Summary | streets.mn - March 9, 2014

    […] Charts of the Day this week are all about congestion: 7 Most Congested Corridors in the Metro,   Percentage of Miles of Twin City Urban Freeway System Congestion, Twin Cities Freeway Congestion, INRIX Traffic Congestion Scorecard for Minneapolis.  If charts […]

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