Tag Archives | safety

The Opportunity of a Lifetime on Rice Street

Rice Street, the main drag of Saint Paul’s polyglot, working-class North End, has long been seen as a street that primarily serves suburban commuters. Despite the narrow (66′) right-of-way, Rice has four lanes of high-speed traffic all the way from downtown to a block short of Wheelock Parkway, where it switches to a three-lane layout […]

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Chart of the Day: US Road Fatality Rates of Increase by Mode

Here’s a depressing chart, ripped from StreetsBlog’s end-of-year post of 2016 high- and low-lights. It uses Federal transportation data to chart the increase in fatality rates for different modes of travel on US roads: According to the Streetsblog post, the rise in fatalities, particularly for people walking or biking, is a worrisome counter-trend: Bucking a […]

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Saved By The Bell

Editor’s Note: One of the missing voices in bicycle planning in the Twin Cities is college students. This series aims to include the perspectives of a generation that is much less likely than their parents to own vehicles. The authors are Macalester students enrolled in the “Bicycling the Urban Landscape” course. The overarching objective is […]

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World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims (WDR) is commemorated on the third Sunday of November each year – to remember the many millions killed and injured on the world’s roads, together with their families, friends and many others who are also affected. It is also a Day on which we thank the emergency services and reflect on the tremendous burden and cost of this daily continuing disaster to families, communities and countries, and on ways to halt it.

Road deaths and injuries are sudden, violent, traumatic events. Their impact is long-lasting, often permanent. Each year, millions of newly injured and bereaved people from every corner of the world are added to the countless millions who already suffer. The cumulative toll is truly tremendous.

The grief and distress experienced by this huge number of people is all the greater because many of the victims are young, because many of the crashes could and should have been prevented and because governments’ and society’s response to road death and injury and to bereaved and injured victims is often inadequate, unsympathetic, and inappropriate to a loss of life or quality of life.


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Sunday Summary – October 30, 2016

We talk a lot on streets.mn about what will make our communities and especially our streets safer. We talk a lot about infrastructure, about engineering, and  about laws. Yesterday, as a light drizzle fell, I stopped in my car for a pedestrian waiting at a marked crosswalk on Grand Avenue. I was rear-ended. The other […]

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Safety in Numbers: Estimating Bicyclist Activity and Safety in Minneapolis

“Safety in numbers” is the phenomenon of an individual vulnerable road user (pedestrian or bicyclist) experiencing a lower risk of being involved in a crash when there are more people walking and bicycling in that area. This seminar will review a study focused on looking for this phenomenon at intersections in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Using a combination of crash data and bicycle and pedestrian count data from 2000–2010, study findings show—with a few different statistical models—the existence of the safety in numbers effect at Minneapolis street-level (non-highway) intersections.

About the Speaker
Brendan Murphy is the lead data scientist in the Accessibility Observatory at the University of Minnesota. His work at the Observatory focuses on the maintenance and improvement of data and database systems pertaining to accessibility-based analysis of transportation systems. He earned his master’s degree in transportation engineering in 2015.

A live webcast is also available.


Streets.mn is a non-profit and is volunteer run. We rely on your support to keep the servers running. If you value what you read, please consider becoming a member.

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