Tag Archives | equity

Barriers to Bike Share Equity in St. Paul

As the Twin Cities embarks on the next iteration of bike share, it’s important to note a few things as it relates to current plans. In September, Nice Ride Minnesota let an RFP for an operator to come into the Twin Cities and operate the current Nice Ride station-based system until 2010 – or the […]

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Chart of the Day: US Pedestrian Deaths by Race/Ethnicity

Here’s a pretty simple chart from “Dangerous by Design“, Smart Growth America’s three-year-old report on pedestrian safety: The key point on the report’s summary explaining these statistics: Who are the victims of these collisions? People of color and older adults are overrepresented among pedestrian deaths. Non-white individuals account for 34.9 percent of the national population but make […]

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The Ford Site Debate is Also About Equity

About two weeks ago, the Planning Commission finally passed Saint Paul’s plans for the old Ford factory in Highland. The vote was unanimous to support to support the city’s plans, which called for around 4,000 units of housing and plenty of mixed-use, along with a host of other amenities. (Note: there was also an amendment […]

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Transformative Equitable Development: Securing Policy Change

Transformative equitable development focuses on changing the existing system and creating a new paradigm where equity, shared prosperity, and community wealth is the norm. It does this by lifting up the community as decisionmakers on development projects that impact their neighborhoods. Communities themselves decide where infrastructure investments should be allocated and the types of amenities that they expect to see so that as their communities are revitalized, they benefit from associated jobs and economic development.

Community Benefits Agreements and Community Compacts are two tools that residents can use to promote their vision of their neighborhoods with decision makers and developers. CBAs are legally enforceable contracts that hold developers to meeting certain goals in relation to their projects and can include employment, housing, and environmental justice goals that enhance the community’s livability. Community Compacts function similarly to a CBA but are voluntary and based on partnerships. Both tools give community members power in dictating how they want their neighborhoods to look like and can thus be effective tools in fighting against displacement, disinvestment, and further marginalization in the places they love.

Join the Alliance for the last session in our series, Transformative Equitable Development: Securing Lasting Change where presenters will share how community benefits agreements and community compacts can be further leveraged in the Twin Cities region.

Presentations:

Corcoran Neighborhood Development
Presenter: LisaBeth Barajas, Corcoran Neighborhood Organization Vice Chair

Equity Commitments
Presenters: Kenya McKnight, Black Women’s Wealth Alliance President
Owen Duckworth, Alliance for Metropolitan Stability Coalition Organizer

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Your Quick and Cheap All-Purpose Solution for Saint Paul’s East Side

It’s been depressing to read the recent stories about the capital improvement budget (CIB) in Saint Paul. A group of East Side neighborhoods commissioned a study to point out the inequity and imbalance in infrastructure spending in the city. Fair enough, even though some of the results are a bit arbitrary  or unclear — for example, the […]

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Minneapolis Skyways Offer an Escape from Reality

“Since the first skyway opened in 1962,” Kim Ode writes in her piece on the expansion of the Minneapolis Skyway System, “the elevated passages have signified escape, whether from traffic noise, stoplights or the weather.” Yet there is another kind of escapism at play here: an escape from the demands of empathy, social responsibility, and […]

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Chart of the Day: Walkable Urbanism vs Social Equity

Here’s a chart from a recent Citylab article called “In the U.S., Walkability is a Premium Good“, using a new analysis of the amount of “walkable urbanism”  in different US cities. (Or, as I think of it, the “sidewalk factor.”) The article goes over a number of different variables correlated with walkability, including GDP, but the chart […]

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Route 54 Ridership and Why We Cannot Skip the Route to the Airport

Recently, posts about the Riverview Corridor have been generating a LOT of comments on streets.mn. One of these posts suggested that, in order to ensure the old Ford factory in Highland Park develops in a way that would not be thoroughly suburban, that the Riverview Corridor should be rerouted through Highland Park on the old […]

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A Quick Fix for Minneapolis Transit

Last week, David Levinson asked whether we are “building a city” in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. He noted that rail investments only make sense in areas where there is sufficient density to support those investments. He further wondered whether Minneapolis and St. Paul could achieve those requisite densities for a majority of residents in […]

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