Author: Andy Singer

Andy Singer

About Andy Singer

Andy Singer is doing his second tour as volunteer co-chair of the Saint Paul Bicycle Coalition. He works as a professional cartoonist and illustrator and has authored of four books including his latest, "Why We Drive," which examines environmental, land use and political issues in transportation. You can see more of his cartoons at AndySinger.com.

Cleveland Avenue Bike Lanes

This coming Wednesday, June 17, at 5:30pm, the Saint Paul City Council faces its first test for implementing the city’s Bikeways Plan. The plan calls for bike lanes on Cleveland Avenue. The question is: Will they vote to implement the plan, or will they listen to claims of bike lane opponents and scrap a major […]

Saint Paul Bike to Work Week

National Bike to Work Week is coming up and, for once, Saint Paul has something to celebrate. We passed a bike plan back in March and already we have three potential bikeway projects up for public discussion. We’ve moved from having public meetings about plans (many of which never got implemented) to having meetings about […]

Cartoon car evolving to bicycling

St. Paul City Council to Vote on Bike Plan

This Wednesday, March 18, at 5:30pm, on the third floor of City Hall, Saint Paul may take a giant step forward in urban evolution. After years of planning and procedural hurdles, the Saint Paul Bikeways Plan is finally coming before the City Council for an up or down vote. I can understand why some folks […]

A Twin Cities Paving Moratorium

Last Wednesday (February 4)  I attended a public presentation by Ramsey County engineers for a proposed redesign of the Randolph and Lexington Avenue intersection. They are proposing to spend a million and a half dollars to purchase four properties on the northeast corner of the intersection and bulldoze them to make space for a dedicated […]

A License To Walk

Some people inside and outside the bicycling community believe that we should require cyclists to get licenses and/or register their bikes with the state. License and registration fees would help pay for bicycle infrastructure and ensure that all cyclists are adequately trained in correct riding techniques. Motorists like this idea because they think cyclists don’t […]

Pave Saint Paul!

[Disclaimer: This post is clearly a late submission for Snark Week, which you can read all about here and here.] America was founded on parking. In the 1500s, the first white settlers came here from Europe looking for parking. When all the spaces filled up, they moved west in search of more parking. The search […]

The War on Pedestrians

Updated November 6, 2014* Many veterans have come back from Iraq and Afghanistan with permanent, disabling wounds. Many suffer head traumas from concussions or fractured skulls when vehicles they’re traveling in are blown up by Improvised Explosive Devices. Pedestrians and Cyclists in Saint Paul are also seeing combat type head traumas—like Sowinta Kay, age 20, who was […]

Ideas for Twin Cities Bike Builders

When I draw cartoons about imaginary bicycles, I try to make the designs believable and think about how they might actually be constructed. In this first example, the projector bike would be pretty complicated to build, perhaps impossible, but the other three designs wouldn’t be that hard and they might produce bikes that would be […]

Bicycle Infrastructure: Minneapolis vs. Saint Paul

In January this year, when the Draft Saint Paul Bikeways Plan was released to the public, people in the media called to ask me what I thought of the plan and why I thought Minneapolis was so far ahead of Saint Paul when it came to bicycle infrastructure. I couldn’t comment on the plan because […]

Saint Paul’s New Street Design Manual

The wave of new “Complete Streets” laws require cities to develop “Complete Streets Plans” and new street design manuals. Street design manuals are like smart phone contracts or software download agreements. They tend to be so mind-numbingly boring and full of technical jargon that, rather than read them, we just click “agree.” Later on, we […]